Liuzhou Laowai

Random thoughts on life in Liuzhou, Guangxi, China

Remembering the Past and Building a Peace

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Liuzhou museum is holding a temporary exhibition of photographs and calligraphy from around 1944-1945 as part of China’s marking of what they call “The Chinese war of resistance against Japanese aggression and the victory of the world anti-fascist war seventieth anniversary”.

They exhibit, which is on the first floor, covers the evacuation of the city as the Japanese approached, the US Flying Tigers and Liuzhou Old Airport, the destruction of the city and the return of the evacuees.

Despite the uber-nationalist propaganda and the anti-Japanese rhetoric, but mindful of the atrocities Japan did inflict, the exhibition is of interest. Many, but not all, of the pictures are also on my website here. I also seem to have some they don’t have.

Here are a few from the exhibition

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Liuzhou Airport 1944. Home to the Flying Tigers

Rolling the runway - Liuzhou Airport

Rolling the runway – Liuzhou Airport

Accommodation for Flying Tigers

Accommodation for Flying Tigers

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Refugees fleeing Liuzhou as the Japanese army advance from Guilin

Refugees fleeing Liuzhou as the Japanese army advance from Guilin

Refugees fleeing Liuzhou as the Japanese army advance from Guilin

Refugee camp in Liuzhou

Refugee camp in Liuzhou

Bridges bombed to prevent the Japanese using them

Bridges bombed to prevent the Japanese using them

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For once, all images are captioned in both Chinese and English.

Liuzhou 1945

Liuzhou 1945

This exhibition runs until September 13th.

The museum is open from 9.00 to 17:00 every day except Mondays. Last admission 16:00.

 

. This entry was posted on Wednesday, July 29th, 2015 at 4:49 pm and is filed under About Liuzhou, History, Propaganda. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

2 Responses to “Remembering the Past and Building a Peace”

  1. David Says:

    Given the awful suffering and isolation that the ordinary Chinese went through during this time in particular it strikes me as somewhat , and typically , generous of them to include the “world anti fascist war” in the title .
    I rarely see our (western) histories of this time being so inclusive of the Chinese people’s suffering other than as a footnote .
    Opportunity for an L.L. article of this time as it affected Guangxi and Hunan provinces ?

  2. Liuzhou Laowai Says:

    “it strikes me as somewhat, and typically, generous of them to include the “world anti fascist war” in the title.”

    That is the officially approved name. Has been for years.

    But I agree with your point that it is more inclusive than the west’s World War Two.



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